Acoustic Astronaut
vorrid:

untitled by Ry_Matthew on Flickr.

vorrid:

untitled by Ry_Matthew on Flickr.

pinktin:

“We can’t stop here, this is sloth country”

pinktin:

“We can’t stop here, this is sloth country”

infinitylooper:

Something to think about:
The Earth is 4.6 billion years old. Let’s scale that to 46 years. We have been here for 4 hours. Our industrial revolution began 1 minute ago. In that time, we have destroyed more than 50% of the world’s forests.
This isn’t sustainable.

infinitylooper:

Something to think about:

The Earth is 4.6 billion years old. Let’s scale that to 46 years.
We have been here for 4 hours. Our industrial revolution began 1 minute ago.
In that time, we have destroyed more than 50% of the world’s forests.

This isn’t sustainable.

disminucion:

(by Benjamin Williamson)
misscannabliss:

speakerforthetrees:

rawlivingfoods:

Seattle’s vision of an urban food oasis is going forward. A seven-acre plot of land in the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood will be planted with hundreds of different kinds of edibles: walnut and chestnut trees; blueberry and raspberry bushes; fruit trees, including apples and pears; exotics like pineapple, yuzu citrus, guava, persimmons, honeyberries, and lingonberries; herbs; and more. All will be available for public plucking to anyone who wanders into the city’s first food forest.
“This is totally innovative, and has never been done before in a public park,” Margarett Harrison, lead landscape architect for the Beacon Food Forest project, tells TakePart. Harrison is working on construction and permit drawings now and expects to break ground this summer.
The concept of a food forest certainly pushes the envelope on urban agriculture and is grounded in the concept of permaculture, which means it will be perennial and self-sustaining, like a forest is in the wild. Not only is this forest Seattle’s first large-scale permaculture project, but it’s also believed to be the first of its kind in the nation.
Read More

So proud!!!

so amazing! some people in my agroecology worked on this project in the fall. i’m sure that if anyone in the seattle area is interested in volunteering now, your help would be greatly appreciated. :)) 

misscannabliss:

speakerforthetrees:

rawlivingfoods:

Seattle’s vision of an urban food oasis is going forward. A seven-acre plot of land in the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood will be planted with hundreds of different kinds of edibles: walnut and chestnut trees; blueberry and raspberry bushes; fruit trees, including apples and pears; exotics like pineapple, yuzu citrus, guava, persimmons, honeyberries, and lingonberries; herbs; and more. All will be available for public plucking to anyone who wanders into the city’s first food forest.

“This is totally innovative, and has never been done before in a public park,” Margarett Harrison, lead landscape architect for the Beacon Food Forest project, tells TakePart. Harrison is working on construction and permit drawings now and expects to break ground this summer.

The concept of a food forest certainly pushes the envelope on urban agriculture and is grounded in the concept of permaculture, which means it will be perennial and self-sustaining, like a forest is in the wild. Not only is this forest Seattle’s first large-scale permaculture project, but it’s also believed to be the first of its kind in the nation.

Read More

So proud!!!

so amazing! some people in my agroecology worked on this project in the fall. i’m sure that if anyone in the seattle area is interested in volunteering now, your help would be greatly appreciated. :)) 

homeintheforest:

switz02 by Mike Filippoff on Flickr.
epickstyle:

After my #snowboarding crash yesterday, I can say I’m living my life like this!

epickstyle:

After my #snowboarding crash yesterday, I can say I’m living my life like this!

yarrowandyew:

smart-gardener:

koenigaraymo:

Build a $300 underground greenhouse for year-round gardening
Growers in colder climates often utilize various approaches to extend the growing season or to give their crops a boost, whether it’s coldframes, hoop houses or greenhouses.
Greenhouses are usually glazed structures, but are typically expensive to construct and heat throughout the winter. A much more affordable and effective alternative to glass greenhouses is the walipini (an Aymara Indian word for a “place of warmth”), also known as an underground or pit greenhouse. First developed over 20 years ago for the cold mountainous regions of South America, this method allows growers to maintain a productive garden year-round, even in the coldest of climates.[…]
Click here to read more!

OK, I’m interested…

learned a ton about these last weekend :D

yarrowandyew:

smart-gardener:

koenigaraymo:

Build a $300 underground greenhouse for year-round gardening

Growers in colder climates often utilize various approaches to extend the growing season or to give their crops a boost, whether it’s coldframes, hoop houses or greenhouses.

Greenhouses are usually glazed structures, but are typically expensive to construct and heat throughout the winter. A much more affordable and effective alternative to glass greenhouses is the walipini (an Aymara Indian word for a “place of warmth”), also known as an underground or pit greenhouse. First developed over 20 years ago for the cold mountainous regions of South America, this method allows growers to maintain a productive garden year-round, even in the coldest of climates.[…]

Click here to read more!

OK, I’m interested…

learned a ton about these last weekend :D

f0rbidden-forest:

110716_JTSi_0968_h_p.jpg by panafoot on Flickr.
bjornnormann:

Photo from Flickr by danielvansbro.

bjornnormann:

Photo from Flickr by danielvansbro.